New feedstock slated for Sarnia-Lambton chemical industries

From Sitelines: The Sarnia-Lambton Economic Partnership’s news for investors and site selectors

A number of companies are vying to bring new supplies of ethane from the Marcellus Shale in the US Appalachian Basin to Sarnia-Lambton.

The Sarnia-Lambton Economic Partnership then pretends that the Chemical Valley industries are good for everyone in the area, by claiming that…

The announcements are harbingers of bright days ahead for Sarnia-Lambton and its petrochemical sector.

In March 2011 Sunoco Logistics and MarkWest Energy Partners announced that the companies are partnering to deliver Marcellus Shale ethane to Sarnia-Lambton ethane consumers. The companies expect to be transporting up to 65,000 barrels a day of ethane by the third quarter of 2012.

In the same month Caiman Energy and NOVA Chemicals announced a memo of understanding for the supply of ethane from Caiman’s plant in West Virginia to NOVA’s Sarnia-Lambton manufacturing facility in St. Clair Township.  In 2010 Kinder Morgan and Buckeye Partners announced plans for pipeline projects, and their desire to supply ethane to Sarnia-Lambton. NOVA’s  St. Clair Township plant in Sarnia-Lambton

Sarnia-Lambton economic development news Since the 1960s ethane has become an important feedstock for the petrochemical industry’s production of ethylene. With crude oil currently nearly 25 times more costly than natural gas, this new and near-by supply of ethane will provide an affordable, abundant, and reliable feedstock for ethylene production in Sarnia-Lambton.

Found mainly in products such as garbage bags and packaging, the world’s most widely-used plastic is made from ethylene. Over half of global supply of ethylene is used in its production.

The bulletin closes by marketing Chemical Valley in this way –

As companies look toward Sarnia-Lambton as a key player in the new Marcellus Shale value change it is demonstrated yet again why this area is a key player on the global chemical stage.

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